What is Pterygium, Dr Jai Eye Centre, Pterygium Surgery, Bundaberg

What is Pterygium? A pterygium is a wedge-shaped growth of thickened tissue that covers the white part of the eye. Typically, a pterygium starts growing near the inside corner of the eye. It is not a cancer and will not develop into cancer.

This leaflet is intended to provide you with general information. It is not a substitute for advice from your ophthalmologist. You are encouraged to discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your ophthalmologist.

Further Information on Pterygium

 

Refractive Surgery Facts, Dr Jai Eye Centre, Bundaberg

Refractive Surgery Facts: The aim of refractive surgery is to reduce a person’s dependence on glasses and contact lenses. This is achieved by treating nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), and/or astigmatism.

This leaflet is intended to provide you with general information. It is not a substitute for advice from your ophthalmologist. You are encouraged to discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your ophthalmologist.

Further Information on Refractive Surgery

 

Retinal Vein Occlusion, Dr Jai Eye Centre, Bundaberg

Retinal Vein Occlusion: Your retina has veins and other blood vessels that carry blood. When a vein in your retina is blocked (occluded), it is called a retinal vein occlusion. This can be caused by a blood clot. Or it can happen when a larger blood vessel presses down on the vein.

This leaflet is intended to provide you with general information. It is not a substitute for advice from your ophthalmologist. You are encouraged to discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your ophthalmologist.

Further Information on Retinal Vein Occlusions

 

Strabismus Surgery, Dr Jai Eye Centre, Bundaberg

Strabismus Surgery: Strabismus is the term for incorrect alignment of the eyes. That is, they do not point in the same direction when looking at an object. An eye with strabismus may turn inward, outward, upward or downward. Strabismus may be present all the time or it can come and go. It may occur in one eye only, or it may alternate from eye to eye.

This leaflet is intended to provide you with general information. It is not a substitute for advice from your ophthalmologist. You are encouraged to discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your ophthalmologist.

Further Information on Strabismus Surgeries

 

Uveitis and Iritis, Dr Jai Eye Centre, Bundaberg

Uveitis and Iritis is an inflammation of any part of the uvea. The eye has three different layers of tissue: the protective outer layer called the sclera, the middle layer called the uvea, and the inner layer called the retina. The iris, ciliary body and choroid form the uvea. Sometimes, uveitis affects other areas of the eye, for example, the retina, optic nerve or the lens.

This leaflet is intended to provide you with general information. It is not a substitute for advice from your ophthalmologist. You are encouraged to discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your ophthalmologist.

Further Information on Uveitis & Iritis

 

Epiphora watery eye, Epiphora ASA, Dr Jai Eye Centre, Bundaberg

An abnormal overflow of tears from the eyes is called epiphora or watery eye. Acute episodes usually result from an irritant to the eyes, such as sawdust or an allergy. They usually clear up quickly with minor treatment. However, chronic epiphora is usually more complex, and the condition may require surgery.

This leaflet is intended to provide you with general information. It is not a substitute for advice from your ophthalmologist. You are encouraged to discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with your ophthalmologist.

Further information on Epiphora or watery eye